Incontinence is a term that describes any accidental or involuntary loss of urine from the bladder (urinary incontinence) or bowel motion, faeces or wind from the bowel (faecal or bowel incontinence). 

Incontinence is a widespread condition that ranges in severity from just a small leak to complete loss of bladder or bowel control. It can often be a sign of other health problems. Sometimes it can be cured and other times it can be managed better with the right advice or treatment. 

If you are experiencing bladder or bowel control issues, you need to first seek medical advice. There is a range of management options available, and your doctor or healthcare  professional is the best person to discuss which course of action is best. 

There are many types of incontinence: 

Whatever how light your bladder leakage maybe we recommend you speak to a healthcare professional or your Dr even if you have only experienced a couple of episodesIf you are experiencing more than one episode regularly, we suggest keeping a diary and record time, date and the amount of fluid loss. Refer to the Continence Foundation Of Australia who have developed a questionnaire to help you determine if you have incontinence.  

Incontinence is not just a problem for older people, anyone at any age can develop some form of incontinence and it should not be considered normal. However, women are more prone to incontinence than men. 

Most people think that incontinence is a female condition, but in fact, one in ten Australian men experience regular bladder leakage. 

Men: Incontinence isn’t just a “female problem” 

Incontinence can be slightly bothersome or totally debilitating.
Men are often uninformed about the issues, the chance of embarrassment keeps them from enjoying many activities, including exercising, and causes emotional distress. According to the National Association for Continence* (NAFC), between 2% and 15% of men ages 15 to 64, and 5% to 15% of men over 60 who live at home have incontinence. 

Tips 

A useful aid is the Ontex Continence Care Tips booklet. The booklet provides tips on living with incontinence and how to continue to live a full and active life.  

For a free copy of the booklet use the contact us form on our website or if you are a healthcare professional contact your local Business Development Manager on 1300 788 601 

For more useful tips and advice, we recommend reaching out to The Continence Foundation of Australia. They have a free call helpline 1800 33 00 66 or go to their website www.continence.org.au 

 

 

Sources: 

National Association for Continence https://www.nafc.org/ 

 

TYPES OF INCONTINENCE  

Urinary incontinence exists in several different types, understanding which type you have can help you get the appropriate treatment for effective prevention.  

Below is a list of the most common and some useful information on each. 

STRESS INCONTINENCE Stress incontinence refers to stress upon the sphincter and pelvic muscles.  

A person with stress incontinence will experience small urine loss from coughing, sneezing, laughing or physical activities such as running, lifting heavy objects or getting off a chair or bed. This is the most common type of incontinence and occurs mainly in women.  

RETENTION/OVERFLOW INCONTINENCE A person with retention/overflow incontinence strains to pass urine and feels that their bladder hasn’t emptied completely. As a result, they may experience constant dribbling and may suffer from recurrent urinary tract infections. Retention/overflow incontinence is common in males who have an enlarged prostate gland.  

OVERACTIVE BLADDER (OAB) Overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome is characterised by urgency, often with frequency and nocturia and sometimes leakage (urge incontinence). It is often but not always associated with detrusor muscle over-activity.  

FUNCTIONAL INCONTINENCE Functional incontinence is the result of physical, psychological and/ or environmental problems that affect a person’s ability to reach or use the toilet. Some of these problems include poor mobility, poor dexterity, and loss of memory or even poor building design.  

REFLEX INCONTINENCE A person suffering reflex incontinence will find that their bladder has emptied without any warning or, in some cases, without any sensation that this has occurred. Reflex incontinence can often be the result of a spinal cord injury.  

NOCTURIA INCONTINENCE A person with nocturia will wake frequently during the night to go to the toilet and find that they have insufficient time to reach the toilet once they have woken. A person with nocturnal enuresis will lose urine while they are sleeping, usually at night.  

MIXED INCONTINENCE Mixed incontinence is the combination of both stress and urge incontinence. Mixed incontinence often affects women. 

CAUSES OF INCONTINENCE  

There are many different causes of incontinence and wrecommend you visit your Dr  or healthcare professional if you feel you have experienced bladder leakage.   

Your Dr will be able to best determine what are the causes. 

If your Dr or Healthcare professional recommends using an incontinence aid, Ontex have large range from light to heavy  and all products are dermatologically tested.  You can also order free samples online from our website. All orders will be sent to you in discreet packaging

Tips 

A useful aid is the Ontex Continence Care Tips booklet. The booklet provides tips on living with incontinence and how to continue to live a full and active life.  

For a free copy of the booklet use the contact us form on our website or if you are a healthcare professional contact your local Business Development Manager on 1300 788 601. 

For useful tips and advice we recommend reaching out to  The Continence Foundation of Australia. They have a free call helpline 1800 33 00 66 or go to their website www.continence.org.au 

Over 4.8 million Australians over the age of 15 (approximately 20% of the total population) have bladder or bowel control problems. Urinary incontinence affects up to 13% of Australian men (1 in 10) and up to 37% of Australian women (1 in 3). Faecal incontinence affects up to 20% of Australian men and up to 12.9% of Australian women (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report, 2006*). 

It is likely that the true number of people affected is much higher. Many people do not tell their doctor or healthcare professional about their incontinence, due to embarrassment. Some people wrongly think that incontinence is a normal part of aging or that it cannot be treated. This is unfortunate, as many cases can be successfully treated or significantly improved 

Key Stats – Deloitte Access Economic Report* 

As shown from the Deloitte Access Economics  Report* incontinence is a common condition so you should not feel you are alone or suffer alone.  

Causes and help 

Incontinence can affect people of any age both men and women. There are certain life events that you increase your risk of developing urinary incontinence. These events include stress, pregnancy, menopause and some surgical operations. Certain medications, such as diuretics, some blood pressure medications, and antidepressants, can cause urinary incontinence, or at least be a contributing factor 

Talking to a healthcare professional is important  

Do not feel embarrassed if you experience incontinence you are not alone. Your healthcare professional can advise ways to manage your incontinence or depending on your conditions cure it 

If you suspect medications may be increasing or even causing continence problems, let your doctor or healthcare professional  know about all the medicines you take, both prescription and over-the-counter. That way, your doctor or healthcare professional can help determine whether these medicines should be adjusted or stopped, or if a treatment should be modified. 

Tips 

A useful aid is the Ontex Continence Care Tips booklet. The booklet provides tips on living with incontinence and how to continue to live a full and active life. 

For a free copy of the booklet use the contact us form on our website or if you are a healthcare professional contact your local Business Development Manager on 1300 788 601 

Note as pat of ongoing commitment providing the best possible continence care solutions, we offer Free Samples of our products, providing  consumers with the opportunity to trial and experience for themselves.  

For more useful tips and advice we recommend reaching out to The Continence Foundation of Australia. They have a free call helpline 1800 33 00 66 or go to their website www.continence.org.au 

 

Sources: 

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report, 2006 https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/australias-health/australias-health-2006/contents/table-of-contents 

Deloitte Access Economic Report https://www.continence.org.au/resource/deloitte-access-economics-report-economic-impact-incontinence-australia 

Managing everyday life can be challenging when you or the person you are caring for is affected by incontinence. However with planning and with some lifestyle changes this does not have to be the case. Most people find they, or the person they are caring for, can live their life to the fullest.  

There are many types of incontinence and each has a different cause and different symptoms. Therefore, to get the appropriate treatment it is important to identify which type of incontinence you have. For most people the use of simple pelvic floor exercises, lifestyle changes and use of incontinence aids will suffice. It is always best to discuss your treatment options with your healthcare professional.  

Here are our tips on how to cope with the daily challenges of living with incontinence.  

OTHER USEFUL TIPS For more information and advice visit http://www.continence.org.au/ or contact The Continence Foundation of Australia National Continence Helpline free call on 1800 33 00 66 

Seek a referral to a continence advisor or physician who is well-informed about urinary incontinence. Be motivated and persistent in seeking the right help. 

PELVIC FLOOR EXERCISES 

Also known as Kegels, these exercises focus on strengthening the pelvic floor muscles which support the uterus, bladder and other pelvic organs.  

Performing these exercises regularly can help prevent accidental urine leakage. Kegel exercises can benefit both men and women who have urinary incontinence. It is never too early or late to begin exercising your pelvic floor. Find out how to strengthen your pelvic floor muscles. http://www.pelvicfloorfirst.org.au/  

 

FLUID IN-TAKE 

Many people who have urinary incontinence believe that drinking less will help avoid accidents and other symptoms of urinary incontinence. This isn’t exactly true as it can lead to other health issues. Drinking the right amount of water is important to keep a healthy balance of fluids and is extremely important for your overall health.  

Dehydration from not drinking enough liquid can cause your urine to become very concentrated which can irritate your bladder and make incontinence worse. 

Aim to drink 6-8 glasses of fluid per day (preferably water), unless otherwise advised by your doctor.  

Limit drinking bladder irritants such as carbonated drinks, tea and coffee (with or without caffeine), artificial sweeteners, corn syrup, foods and beverages that are high in spice, sugar and acid; such as citrus and tomatoes. 

EAT A HEALTHY DIET  

It is important to eat well to keep your bowels healthy and regular. A poor diet can cause chronic constipation which can lead to faecal incontinence.  

Fibre is an essential component of every diet. Aim for 25 to 30g of fibre every day which should include at least 2 servings of fruit and 5 serves of vegetables as this will help keep your bowels healthy and in good working order. 

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY HELPS PREVENT INCONTINENCE  

Physical activity helps prevent constipation by stimulating the muscular activity of the bowel. Exercise also helps to maintain a healthy body weight and reduce pressure on the pelvic floor. Be active every day and do at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity, such as walking. 

STOP SMOKING 

Smoking is associated with a variety of health issues such as an increased risk of lung cancer, heart disease, and high blood pressure.  

Smoking can also have an impact on the bladder as it’s estimated that smokers are three times more likely to experience incontinence than non-smokers. Quitting smoking could improve the symptoms significantly.  

GOOD TOILET HABITS  

One of the best ways to avoid an accident is to have a bathroom schedule. It is normal to go to the toilet between 4-8 times per day and no more than once/twice a night.  

Don’t get into the habit of going to the toilet ‘just in case’ as this tends to result in the bladder developing a smaller capacity. Try to go only when your bladder is full and when you need to go. (Going to the toilet before you go to bed is fine). 

 

Tips 

A useful aid is the Ontex Continence Care Tips booklet. The booklet provides tips on living with incontinence and how to continue to live a full and active life.  

For a free copy of the booklet use the contact us form on our website or if you are a healthcare professional contact your local Business Development Manager on 1300 788 601. 

For more useful tips and advice we recommend reaching out to  The Continence Foundation of Australia. They have a free call helpline 1800 33 00 66 or go to their website www.continence.org.au. 

 

 

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